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Cultural awareness

  • Cultural days of significance

    Information about cultural days of significance in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural calendar, including Sorry Day, Mabo Day, Reconciliation Week, NAIDOC Week and more.

  • NAIDOC Week

    NAIDOC celebrates the rich, diverse culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, ”the First Australians. It acknowledges their history, culture and achievements as well as past injustices they have endured.

  • Reconciliation

    National Reconciliation Week is held every year from 27 May until 3 June. The week celebrates and builds on the respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

Events

The department provides the opportunity for organisations to publicise their upcoming event through our online events calendar.

The events published are compiled and maintained using the information provided to the department by the coordinating organisation. It is the responsibility of the coordinating organisation to provide us with any updates or changes to the event so that these can be reflected accurately in the events calendar.

What type of events can you submit?

Whilst the department supports and encourages events that enhance economic participation and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage, it reserves the right not to publish events that do not meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Events and seminars that support education and mentoring for Indigenous Queenslanders. (E.g: tertiary education expos, industry engagement seminars)
  • Events and seminars that promote employment opportunities for Indigenous Queenslanders
  • Events that promote and celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage.

Decision to omit an event from the calendar

In the situation where an event is deemed unsuitable for publishing to our website, the coordinating organisation will be notified in writing by a department representative.

deadly stories

About deadly stories

The deadly stories campaign celebrates the many achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their communities across Queensland. Promotional activities, regional events and our deadly stories gallery provide an opportunity to share challenges and triumphs, and salute the everyday success stories of Indigenous Queenslanders.

How to share a story

If you are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and you have a story to tell, or know of someone who has a story to tell, this is the place to share it. Submit your deadly story!

Take the time to read a story or two, and be inspired by the extraordinary things Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people are achieving across the state.

Regional centres

The Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services has regional offices across Queensland with service centres located in many major regional centres. Regional offices work with community leaders, funded service providers, businesses and the other layers of government to lead and contribute to key initiatives for the Queensland Government that provide appropriate, accessible and quality services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

Remote Indigenous Land and Infrastructure Program Office

The Program Office covers the land and infrastructure requirements for all 16 discrete Indigenous Local Government Areas in Queensland (Aurukun, Doomadgee, Cherbourg, Hope Vale, Kowanyama, Lockhart River, Mapoon, Mornington Island, Napranum, Northern Peninsula Area, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Torres Straits, Woorabinda, Wujal Wujal and Yarrabah) as well as for the following areas: Coen, Cooktown, Laura, Mona Mona, Mossman Gorge and Weipa.

Address:
Level 9, Cairns Corporate Tower, 15 Lake Street, Cairns Qld 4870
Phone:
07 4057 3862
Fax:
07 4057 3890
Postal address:
PO Box 5461 Cairns Qld 4870

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Remote Government Coordination

The Remote Government Coordination office coordinates government programs and services for the following local government (shire council and regional council) areas: Aurukun, Cook (including Coen and Laura), Hope Vale, Kowanyama, Lockhart River, Mapoon, Napranum, Pormpuraaw, Weipa, Wujal Wujal, Yarrabah and Mossman Gorge. There are 4 office locations:

Address:
Level 9, Cairns Corporate Tower, 15 Lake Street Cairns Qld 4870
Phone:
07 4057 3862
Fax:
07 4057 3890
Postal address:
PO Box 5461 Cairns Qld 4870
Address:
Fred Kerindun Business Centre Kang Kang Road, Aurukun Qld 4871
Phone:
07 4082 4507
Mobile:
0477 307 879
Fax:
07 4060 6215
Address:
12 Walker Street, Cooktown Qld 4895
Phone:
07 4082 2000
Mobile:
0427 160 643
Fax:
07 4069 5098
Postal address:
PO Box 761 Cooktown Qld 4895
Address:
Suite 2, 202 Kerr Point Road, Weipa Qld 4874
Phone:
07 4082 4501
Mobile:
0428 100 934
Fax:
07 4069 7504

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Torres Region

The Torres Region covers the following local government (shire council and regional council) areas: Northern Peninsula Area, Torres Shire Council and the Torres Strait Island Regional Council.

Address:
Level 1, 46 Victoria Parade, Thursday Island Qld 4875
Postal address:
PO Box 94 Thursday Island Qld 4875
Phone:
07 4069 1243
Fax:
07 4069 1781

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Far North Queensland Region

The Far North Queensland Region covers the following local government (shire council and regional council) areas: Cairns, Cassowary Coast, Croydon, Douglas, Etheridge, Mareeba and Tablelands.

Address:
Level 3, Citicentral Building 65-67 Spence St, Cairns Qld 4870
Postal address:
PO Box 5365 Cairns Qld 4870
Phone:
07 4232 4232

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North Queensland Region

The North Queensland Region covers the local government (city, shire and regional council) areas of Boulia, Burdekin, Burke, Carpentaria, Charters Towers, Cloncurry, Doomadgee, Flinders, Hinchinbrook, Isaac, McKinley, Mackay, Mornington Island, Mount Isa, Palm Island, Richmond, Townsville and Whitsunday.

There are 3 office locations:

Address:
4th Floor, State Government Building, 187 – 209 Stanley Street, Townsville Qld 4810
Postal address:
PO Box 5620 Townsville Qld 4810
Phone:
07 4799 7470
Fax:
07 4799 7549
Address:
52 Miles Street, Mt. Isa Qld 4825
Postal address:
PO Box 309 Mt. Isa Qld 4825
Phone:
07 4747 2089
Fax:
07 4743 9611
Address:
Level Ground, Verde Central, 44 Nelson Street, Mackay Qld 4740
Postal address:
PO Box 1533 Mackay Qld 4740
Phone:
07 4862 7001

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Central Queensland Region

The Central Queensland Region has 2 office locations.

The Hervey Bay office covers the local government (shire and regional council) areas of Bundaberg, Fraser Coast, North Burnett, South Burnett and Cherbourg.

Address:
Level 1, Brendan Hansen Building, 50-54 Main Street, Pialba Qld 4655
Postal address:
PO Box 3444 Hervey Bay Qld 4655
Phone:
07 4125 9366
Fax:
07 4125 9373

The Rockhampton office covers the local government (regional and shire council) areas of Central Highlands, Gladstone, Rockhampton, Banana, Barcaldine, Barcoo, Blackall Tambo, Diamantina, Longreach, Winton and Woorabinda.

Address:
Level 2, 209 Bolsover Street, Rockhampton Qld 4700
Postal address:
PO Box 883 Rockhampton Qld 4700
Phone:
07 4938 4690
Fax:
07 4938 4369

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South West Region

The South West Region covers the local government (shire, regional and city council) areas of Balonne, Bulloo, Goondiwindi, Ipswich, Lockyer Valley, Maranoa, Murweh, Paroo, Quilpie, Roma, Southern Downs, Toowoomba and Western Downs.

There are 3 office locations:

Address:
Ground Floor, 162 Hume Street, Toowoomba Qld 4350
Postal address:
PO Box 99 Ipswich Qld 4305
Phone:
07 3819 7606
Email:
Ask_SW@DATSIP.qld.gov.au
Address:
Lot 88, Hood Street, Charleville Qld 4470
Postal address:
PO Box 99 Ipswich Qld 4305
Phone:
07 3819 7606
Email:
Ask_SW@DATSIP.qld.gov.au
Address:
Level 2, ICON Building, 117 Brisbane Street, Ipswich Qld 4305
Postal address:
PO Box 99 Ipswich Qld 4305
Phone:
07 3819 7606
Email:
Ask_SW@DATSIP.qld.gov.au

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South East Queensland (South) Region

The South East Queensland (South) Region covers the area south-east of Brisbane and includes local council areas for Logan City Council, Gold Coast City Council and Scenic Rim.

Address:
Level 2, 6 Ewing Road, Woodridge Qld 4114
Postal address:
PO Box 20 Woodridge Qld 4114
Phone:
07 3080 4700
Fax:
07 3287 8313

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South East Queensland (North) Region

The South East Queensland (North) Region covers the Brisbane and north coast areas and includes the local council area for Brisbane City, Moreton Bay Regional Council, Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Gympie Regional Council, Noosa Council, Somerset and Redlands City Council.

There are 2 office locations:

Address:
Level 18, 111 George St Brisbane Qld 4000
Postal address:
PO Box 15397 City East Qld 4002
Phone:
07 3003 6483
Address:
Level 2, 33 King Street, Caboolture Qld 4510
Postal address:
PO Box 284 Caboolture Qld 4510
Phone:
07 5490 1091

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Domestic and Family Violence Taskforce

In February 2015, the Special Taskforce on Domestic and Family Violence released its report entitled Not Now, Not Ever: Putting an End to Domestic and Family Violence in Queensland.

This Report noted that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland experience disproportionately high levels of violence, including domestic and family violence, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women being 35 times more likely than members of the general female population to be hospitalised for spouse/domestic partner assaults.

The Report also notes that the impacts of this violence and abuse in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities cannot be underestimated and contributes to negative effects on psychological and physical health, homelessness, poverty, children’s wellbeing, and education.

The Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships is leading and supporting the implementation of a number of recommendations from the Report. This includes recommendation 93 regarding amending the Family Responsibilities Commission Act to include the requirement for a court to notify the Family Responsibilities Commission when a protection order under the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act is made naming a welfare reform community resident as the respondent. To give effect to this recommendation, on 1 December 2015, the Family Responsibilities Commission Amendment Bill was passed by the Queensland Parliament. These legislative changes took effect on 17 December 2015.

The department is also working with agency partners to support integrated approaches to improving the safety of victims and their children, including an integrated response to domestic and family violence in discrete Indigenous communities.

This work involves trialling integrated approaches in 3 sites – one in an urban location, one regional city location with outreach, and one discrete Indigenous community – to consider how service systems can work together in a structured and collaborative way to ensure people affected by domestic and family violence receive quality and consistent support.

The trial sites are:

  • Logan/Beenleigh (urban trial)
  • Mount Isa (regional trial)
  • Cherbourg (the discrete Indigenous community trial).

Some outcomes of work across government so far include:

Program office

Introduction to the Program Office

The remote Indigenous Land and Infrastructure Program Office is part of the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Partnerships. It was established in 2009 to facilitate development across 16 remote discrete Indigenous communities in Queensland.

The Program Office provides government with a ‘one stop shop’ in addressing land administration issues along with whole-of-government coordination of all infrastructure development within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander discrete communities. The Program Office coordinates the following programs in Queensland’s discrete communities:

  • whole-of-government coordination for infrastructure development
  • land use planning schemes
  • native title compliance including Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs)
  • survey works including the Community Survey Program (CSP)
  • tenure resolution including Land Holding Act (LHA) leases (Katter leases)
  • infrastructure development
  • maximising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment, business and training opportunities
  • home ownership
  • cultural heritage compliance.

The Program Office’s work brings the following benefits to community and government:

  • consistency in state dealings across Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  • strengthened relationships within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  • improved surveying within Indigenous communities
  • enhanced employment and business opportunities
  • statutory-compliant land dealings and infrastructure
  • enabling development to occur on Indigenous Trust lands
  • coordination, prioritisation and sequencing of development activities
  • facilitation of necessary essential services, including environmental health infrastructure
  • improved land-use planning by councils/trustees
  • providing pathways to home ownership
  • native title compliance
  • cultural heritage compliance
  • enabling freehold opportunities in Indigenous communities.

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What does ‘engaging with communities’ mean?

For the Program Office, ‘engaging with communities’ means talking to and carefully consulting with Traditional Owners, trustees and councils about housing investment and development opportunities.

The Program Office discuss with communities what needs to be negotiated, agreed upon and finalised before new infrastructure investment can take place. This discussion covers land use and infrastructure planning and the need for new leasing arrangements to enable the government to invest while also creating opportunities for housing, business and social development.

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What does the Program Office deliver to communities?

Whole-of-government coordination

  • identifies government assets and decides how they can best be used
  • determines the broader community land and infrastructure needs
  • coordinates land use planning and administration
  • ensures that government agencies use land and buildings in a coordinated way
  • ensures Integrated Capital Work economic opportunities are maximised.

Land administration

  • makes sure a community’s land use planning scheme complies with current planning laws
  • addresses cultural heritage requirements
  • improves surveying across the whole community to include roads and public infrastructure
  • uses a coordinated approach to addressing different land tenure arrangements in a community, for example, native title matters
  • ensures a strategic approach to future development and is undertaken through master planning.

Coordinated leasing negotiations

  • enable the government to invest in new housing and other leasing in communities.

Home ownership

  • assists individuals, trustees and councils to enable home ownership in communities where local indigenous residents want to own their own home.

Freehold in township areas of Indigenous Trust Land

  • provides advice to communities interested in freeholding within their township areas.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment and training

  • maximises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment, training and business development opportunities coming out of the government investment in social housing and infrastructure construction in the discrete communities.

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What does all of this achieve for remote communities?

Through this work the Program Office will help facilitate:

  • new housing and infrastructure development
  • local employment opportunities
  • better use of government assets (for example, houses and offices) better service delivery for water, power and other essentials
  • long-term planning to encourage developmentprivate home ownership opportunities
  • coordinated approach to dealing with native title, cultural heritage and other land-related matters.

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Which communities does the Program Office engage with?

Aurukun, Coen, Cherbourg, Doomadgee, Hope Vale, Kowanyama, Lockhart River, Mapoon, Mona, Mornington Island, Mossman Gorge, Napranum, Northern Peninsula Area, Palm Island, Pormpuraaw, Torres Strait Islands, Woorabinda, Wujal Wujal and Yarrabah.

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Community alcohol limits

If you’re planning on travelling through Queensland, you need to know about alcohol restrictions.

Alcohol restrictions are in place in the discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across Queensland. They aim to help improve the health and well-being of all people living in these communities.

The restrictions either ban or limit the amount and type of alcohol you can take into a community.

What is a restricted area?

A restricted area is where alcohol restrictions apply. This includes the entire area controlled by the local shire council, unless an area is specifically included or excluded.

Homes are included in restricted areas. Beaches, wharves and riverbeds can also be included in the restricted area.

Please refer to each discrete community for further information on restrictions and penalties in place.

Welfare Reform

Welfare reform is one of DATSIP’s key initiatives. In the 2015-16 Budget, the Queensland Government committed $28.6 million over 4 years to extend the welfare reform initiative.

The welfare reform initiative focuses on restoring social norms and social responsibility while re-establishing local leadership and increasing economic participation. Much has already been achieved within the 5 welfare reform communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale, Doomadgee and Mossman Gorge.

The Family Responsibilities Commission (FRC) is a key mechanism supporting the welfare reform program. It is an independent statutory body, established under the Family Responsibilities Commission Act 2008 (the Act). The FRC operates to restore local authority and build stronger and more resilient communities by having the Family Responsibilities Commissioner and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Local Commissioners convene conferences with community members notified to the FRC for breaching a ‘trigger’ under the Act. Triggers include when a child does not attend school or is not enrolled, a person is convicted of a criminal offence, a child safety report is made, a domestic violence order is issued, or a breach of a tenancy arrangement occurs.

Through the welfare reform program, DATSIP has funded among other initiatives:

  • the Aurukun Restorative Justice Program to increase the community’s capacity for local mediation
  • a Parenting Program to support individuals to improve their parenting skills
  • youth engagement and development activities in Doomadgee
  • business development projects in support of increasing local employment opportunities.

Family Responsibilities Commission

Implementation Review of the Family Responsibilities Commission

This report focuses solely on the findings from the Implementation Review of the Family Responsibilities Commission (FRC). This review has considered the implementation and operation of the FRC in the first 18 months of its 3.5-year term. The report highlights the progress made and recommends changes where these could help to improve the effectiveness of the FRC for the remainder of its term. It also documents what is happening in the communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge and considers this in light of what was expected for the Cape York Welfare Reform overall.

Cape York Peninsula Tenure Resolution Program

What is the program about?

The Cape York Peninsula Tenure Resolution Program returns ownership and management of identified lands on Cape York Peninsula to local Aboriginal Traditional Owners, while ensuring the protection of Cape York Peninsula’s iconic natural areas and significant natural and cultural values.

What does the program achieve?

Through this program, the state is changing the tenure of identified properties to Aboriginal freehold land, allowing Traditional Owners to return to live on country and pursue employment and business opportunities in land mangement, grazing, and mining.

Areas with outstanding environmental values are being dedicated as jointly managed national parks, providing for conservation, recreation and tourism. The state is also converting existing national parks to jointly managed national parks, with Aboriginal freehold as the underlying tenure.

To date, tenure resolution has been completed for 22 properties and 18 existing parks, resulting in:

  • 25 Aboriginal freehold transfers outside national parks (more than 1.5 million hectares)
  • 18 existing national parks converted to jointly managed national park (Cape York Peninsula Aboriginal Land or CYPAL) (nearly 1.4 million hectares)
  • 10 new national parks (CYPAL) (nearly 703,962 hectares)
  • 19 nature refuges on Aboriginal freehold (nearly 303,450 hectares
  • more than 105,165 hectares of jointly managed resources reserves
  • in total the program has transferred almost 3,700,990 hectares of land on Cape York Peninsula to Aboriginal ownership.

Fifteen existing national parks in the Cape York Peninsula Region, covering almost 413,300 hectares, are yet to be converted to national park (CYPAL). The iconic Daintree National Park is also scheduled to be converted to jointly managed national park (CYPAL) following discussions with the Eastern Kuku Yalanji people. In May 2017, the property known as Bromley was granted to the Bromley Aboriginal Corporation RNTBC and the new Bromley (Ampulin) and Bromley (Kungkaychi) National Parks (Cape York Peninsula Aboriginal Land) were created. This action protects an extensive wildlife corridor, significant heathlands and internationally important wetlands around the Olive River.

Other key achievements of the Cape York Peninsula Tenure Resolution Program include:

  • working cooperatively with the Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing to support joint management of national parks and associated Aboriginal ranger employment and land management projects including fencing at Rinyirru (Lakefield) and Oyala Thumotang National Parks
  • facilitating the leasing of Aboriginal land for third party grazing and gravel extraction purposes
  • facilitating state and Commonwealth Indigenous land management funding projects to provide Aboriginal employment in fire and pest management
  • supporting Aboriginal landowners for Archer Bend, Batavia, Mary Valley and Olkola lands to plan for sustainable livelihoods and economic development opportunities
  • supporting landholding bodies established under this program (Aboriginal land trusts and corporations) to:
    • become independent, highly functioning land managers
    • meet governance and land management obligations
    • create networks and pursue economic development opportunities.